Others

Family as a success factor

A new study by DZ BANK Research shows: Family businesses are of great economic importance for Germany: over 90 percent of businesses are family-owned. They are not only located in urban areas, but often also in rural regions. In some cases, they are of enormous importance for the economic structure there. The Corona pandemic is also leaving its mark on family businesses. According to an ifo survey, around 80 percent of businesses suffered a drop in orders last year. Family businesses are facing structural challenges. Demographic change will strongly influence the future development of businesses. In the context of generational change, a suitable successor is not always found, and the shortage of skilled workers is also a problem in many industries and rural regions. On the technical side, digitalisation is changing established business models and structures. Especially in rural areas, however, the expansion of the digital infrastructure is not yet…

Dear Readers,

We are very pleased to welcome you to our new DZ Research Blog. It is the continuation and successor of „Bielmeier’s Blog„, which was launched by DZ BANK’s outgoing Chief Economist Stefan Bielmeier about ten years ago. Here you will find comments and assessments from DZ BANK’s Research team, in the same way you were already used to from Bielmeier’s blog. We analyse and evaluate economic data, financial market developments and political events for you – always up-to-date and competent. Find your way through the day-to-day information jungle with us! The expert knowledge of around 85 analysts will continue to ensure that you can always feel well informed on economic and financial issues. If you have not already done so, please subscribe to our newsletter to keep up to date with new blog posts. We wish you informative and enjoyable reading!

Results of DZ BANK’s 50th SME survey: Covid-19 still a burden

The Corona pandemic has SMEs firmly in its grip. Increased infection figures and a renewed lockdown are preventing the economic recovery from the third quarter from continuing for the time being. The longer the crisis lasts, the greater its impact will be on many companies. It is little consolation that some sectors, such as construction, have so far been largely spared the negative economic impact. Overall, the results of our current representative survey of 1,500 SMEs, which we conducted for the 50th time this fall, show that the mood among SMEs is somewhat more positive than at the time of the first lockdown in the spring. Nevertheless, the current crisis represents the greatest challenge for SMEs since the financial crisis, if not longer. However, SMEs went into the crisis well prepared: according to calculations by the Bundesverband der Deutschen Volksbanken und Raiffeisenbanken BVR (Federal Association of German Cooperative Banks), their…

China is gradually regaining its old growth strength

After the deep corona crash at the beginning of the year, the Chinese economy continued its strong recovery over the summer months. Annual economic growth accelerated from 3.2 to 4.9 percent in the third quarter and is thus not far off its previous growth path. By the second quarter, China had already restored its pre-crisis level of economic output. For the year as a whole, there are now signs of growth of around two percent compared with 2019. This makes China one of the very few countries that will even achieve a positive growth rate this year compared to the previous year, and once again proves to be the global economic locomotive. One positive aspect is that the momentum of the recovery has continued until the very end. Both industrial production and the retail trade were able to accelerate their growth significantly in September. The economic climate has recently brightened…

Brexit: Benefits of a trade agreement must be made clear

The free trade talks between Great Britain and the EU have been stalled for months, but since last week they have reached a new low. The brexite drama is back. Once again, everything seems to be heading for a no-deal brexite that would set British trade relations with the EU back to WTO level in an unregulated way. The economic losses that would then be expected for Britain do not seem to play a major role in Boris Johnson’s political calculations. Or are they just not high enough compared to the loss of prosperity that would also be feared if a free trade agreement were successfully concluded? The fact is that Britain’s withdrawal from the internal market will once again create numerous barriers in trade with the EU that were long removed. Some of these barriers to trade could be avoided with a free trade agreement, especially the reintroduction of…

Brexite: Johnson on collision course with the EU

The 8th round of negotiations between the EU and Great Britain on the planned Free Trade Agreement (FTA) will end tomorrow. Negotiations have been underway since the end of February, but have so far been unsuccessful. And this round of negotiations should not be any different. Instead of moving towards each other, the negotiating parties seem to drift further and further apart. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has now also set a hard deadline for the EU summit on October 15. Should the basic structure of an agreement not be in place by then, he wants to prepare his country for a hard brexite. Potentially even more problematic than this deadline is a new draft law that was presented in parliament yesterday. The Internal Market Bill sets out the government’s plans for smooth trade within the UK after the brexite or after the end of the transitional period at the end…

1 2 8